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The Ravens' top five offseason priorities

The Ravens' loss to the Steelers on Saturday probably still stings. Maybe looking ahead to 2011 will help numb the pain a little bit. Here are the Ravens' top five offseason priorities (well, besides getting that whole NFL lockout thing figured out):

1. Re-sign Haloti Ngata: One of the best defensive tackles in the NFL, Ngata, who turns 27 on Friday, is a free agent. He will command top dollar on the open market, but count on Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti doing everything he can to lock Ngata before the start of free agency.

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2. Forge an offensive identity: Offensive coordinator Cam Cameron deserves a pink slip -- or at least an intervention -- after the stacked Ravens offense didn't reach its potential in 2010. Is going all pass-happy still the way to proceed, or would a return to a running-based attack work best? Whoever is calling the plays in 2011 needs to take a long look in the mirror.

3. Plug holes on the line: Expected to be an area of strength entering the season, the offensive line was inconsistent, which contributed to the offense's struggles. The Ravens need a new tackle to work opposite of Michael Oher as Marshal Yanda is best-suited as a mauling interior lineman. They must also find a long-term replacement for center Matt Birk.

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4. Find Suggs a wingman: Terrell Suggs was a one-man wrecking crew this season, and he had three sacks against the Steelers. But that alone wasn't enough to topple Big Ben. The Ravens thought they found Suggs a wingman when they drafted Sergio Kindle last April but calamity and controversy have put his future in doubt. Back to the drawing board, Ozzie Newsome.

5. Shore up the secondary: Cornerbacks Josh Wilson and Chris Carr are free agents, and the Ravens would be wise to bring them back at the right price. The strong safety position should be upgraded. And while Pro Bowl free safety Ed Reed is top-notch, the Ravens need to find an heir apparent should the bearded ballhawk hang up his cleats in the next year or two.

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