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"The King's Speech" enters the Senator tomorrow, and if you haven't seen it -- and even, perhaps, if you have -- it's worth taking in on that theater's big screen. The conventional wisdom goes that epics, spectacles and splashy, stylized musicals are the forms best suited to movie-palace presentation. But when a more intimate movie is as beautifully crafted as "The King's Speech," it develops its own kind of outsize theatrical electricity. The splendor of Colin Firth's performance is not just that he imbues the stuttering King George VI with heroic scale. It's that he manages to generate waves of non-verbal communication with both his speech therapist, played by Geoffrey Rush, and his wife, played by Helena Bonham Carter. (All are brilliant.) Each frame is filled with flickering energy, like an emotional oscilloscope. And when director Tom Hooper opens the film up to take in a world at war, the effect is devastating -- and inspiring. "The King's Speech" has played well everywhere, but I predict that in the superbly proportioned Senator, it will bring audiences to their feet.

Photo by Laurie Sparham of Colin Firth and Helena Bonham Carter in "The King's Speech" 

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