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The play that broke the Ravens' back in the divisional loss at Pittsburgh was the 58-yard bomb to Antonio Brown on third-and-19 from the Steelers' 38. From there, the Steelers punched over the winning touchdown in a 31-24 game. It's a play worth revisiting.

Chuck Pagano, then the secondary coach and now the team's defensive coordinator, said the Ravens were set up in the perfect coverage for that play, rushing three and dropping eight. But the Steelers made the play when second-year cornerback Lardarius Webb allowed Brown to run past him and pull down Ben Roethlisberger's pass before going out of bounds at the 4-yard line.

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"Lardarius was in fabulous position," Pagano said. "If you would have said, 'Ok, here's what they're going to run' before they snap the ball, we couldn't have been in a better coverage. They went [with] four verticals and we went four over four [in coverage].

"So as a young player, he learned a valuable, valuable lesson, which obviously came at a really crucial time and a game-changing time. We always say not one play determines the outcome. [But] that's a tough one to swallow. It's a technique thing."

Webb presumably anticipated a stop route when he allowed Brown to get by him.

"It was almost like [Webb] didn't believe [Brown] was going to run the [go-] route that he ran," Pagano said. "For a split second, [Webb] widened ... he just didn't believe that that was going to be the case and he thought he was in good shape. And all of a sudden, here's a guy that's really, really fast and he's on top of you and it's hard to recover. And [Roethlisberger] made one of those miraculous throws on a windy day and [Brown] pinned it against the side of his helmet."

It's the kind of dramatic, game-changing play that could stay with a young cornerback like Webb.

"You know what you do?" Pagano said. "You go back, [and] evaluate it, so when he comes in here, we'll look at it and say, 'OK, here's what you did. Here's what you did wrong.' And playing that position, you better have amnesia, OK? Because if you can't get over that, it may affect you your whole career.

"So the first thing we said to him on the sideline was, 'Hey, let it go. We've got time on the clock, we're going to go down and score and you're going to have to come back and go make a play because they're going to come at you again. So let it go, get it outof your head.' ... Easier said than done, but that's how you've got to approach it. You've got to take a look at it and say here's the technique, here's what you did wrong on the whole dea, get it fixed and move on."

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