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When I saw the video of the Metrodome roof collapsing and dumping all that show on the Minnesota Vikings' home field, I had to wonder what else could go wrong for the Vikings. The roof already had fallen in on them in a figurative sense with the Brett Favre cell phone scandal and the Randy Moss mutiny, so this was just icing on a rotting cake.

Metrodome memories

The situation did bring back some memories, however, since I was in the Metrodome for the only time the roof failed while there was an event taking place underneath it. That was on April 26, 1986, when a severe windshear tore the roof above the bleachers in right center field and dumped rainwater into the stands during the ninth inning of a game between the Twins and California Angels.

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The tear caused the light standards to swing toward the seats and created some panic in the stands, but the roof did not deflate and the game resumed after a short delay with the Twins leading, 6-1. The evening became even more memorable when the game was restarted and the Angels proceeded to hit three two-run home runs in the ninth inning to win the game -- the final blow a two-out shot into the upper deck in right by rookie first baseman Wally Joyner.

My other memory of that game came afterward. Reggie Jackson, nearing the end of his great career, did not start the game, but came on as a pinch hitter in the top of the ninth. He walked and scored ahead of Joyner, but complained after the game (perhaps only half-seriously) about manager Gene Mauch's decision to send him in to play right field in bottom of the ninth inning -- right under the spot where the roof was damaged.

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Joyner went on to have a terrific season and help lead the Angels into the playoffs, but that was the year of the famous Game 5 collapse against the Boston Red Sox in the American League Championship Series. The Metrodome game was quickly lost to memory in a season that included several big events in Angels history -- including Don Sutton's 300th career victory.

Associated Press photo

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