xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Why not hand some Oscars to 'Unstoppable?'

For thrilling craft and visceral excitement, few American movies this year can match "Unstoppable," the fact-inspired runaway-train adventure that is riding against the wave of movie fantasy and drawing huge audiences by word-of-mouth. Every once in a while, director Tony Scott finds a script that can put his hyper-active style to good use (the last time was a dozen years ago, with "Enemy of the State"). In "Unstoppable," he's a master not just of staging, shooting and editing, but of mood and atmosphere. In one scene -- the train smashing through a horse trailer -- he even tips his hat to the master, Sam Peckinpah. The critical rap on the movie is that it's exciting but empty. I beg to differ. With actors like Denzel Washington, Chris Pine, Rosario Dawson acting at full steam, this movie paints a complex portrait of working life this century, whether it's touching on the push to shove veterans into early retirement with half benefits (and the rift that move creates between younger and older workers) or the dollar-and-cents calculations of beleaguered corporations. "Unstoppable" delivers such an adult, purposefully messy rendering of human error and almost-superhuman heroism that for once you're glad when a movie comes through with a relatively neat wrap-up. A year after the expansion of the best-picture Oscar nomination list to ten movies, all the talk still centers on using it to honor franchises, cartoons, documentaries or sleepers. Why not a genre movie like "Unstoppable," which delivers the goods -- and is really good, to boot?

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement