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"So you're saying I did the right thing by running away from all of my problems?" asks Kenny Powers. He's talking to his father (played by Don Johnson(!)) over Dos Equis and what appears to be real father-son bonding. In some ways, "Chapter 11" played like a setup episode (more on that in a moment) but perhaps more significantly, we learn Kenny isn't a nihilist — he's a baby with daddy issues.

The episode picks up right where "Chapter 10" ended, with Kenny confronting his long-lost father (as a wide-eyed Stevie looks on). They verbally joust, trying to one-up one another (Kenny has a Lamborghini; his dad "Eduardo" has a plane and a boat — irony being that they're both liars. Kenny stole the Lambo and we never see his father's toys.) Kenny approaches the bonkers situation with hesitation (his deadbeat dad ran off to Mexico, changed his name and ignored his son's fame), but as the two catch up, his apprehension melts away, and he beams during the quality time they spend together (sharing a beer, riding ATV's, talking about women). Kenny loves his dad, and yearns for his approval (don't we all), and this reunion is fueling the "Look What I Can Do, Dad!" child inside.

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This is where we should note that Danny McBride is a strong actor. Kenny Powers is a difficult role to play, mostly because you have to make a complete jerk watchable and likable. This is obvious, but it's also a tall order, and McBride walks a tightrope each week. With that said, his source material is failing him. When Kenny's father abruptly sets him and Stevie up to Mexico's police (as fugitives), it's a swift plot change that made me wonder why they wasted an entire chapter on a father character who, for now, has little impact on the story. Sure, it's a way for the creators to justify Kenny's lewd behavior (the rotten apple came from the rotten tree) but to dedicate a whole episode (in a season with only seven) to it seems inexplicable.  

All hope is not lost (there I go again, giving the show the benefit of the doubt), though. A real revelation comes when Kenny and Stevie are sleeping outside (there "wasn't room at the Inn" according to Eduardo). Stevie had lied to Kenny all along: The "love of his life," April, didn't get married after all. Kenny's look of disbelief makes the episode's final scene a forgone conclusion — he leaves April a simply stated voicemail from a payphone: "I'm coming for you." I doubt I was alone when I thought, "Finally!"

As the end of Season 2 approaches, it's become obvious "Eastbound & Down" is a better show when Kenny mixes it up with April. She's naturally sweet, but capable of wicked one-liners and a sense of humor that matches brilliantly with Kenny's. Katy Mixon, the actress who plays April, understands Apatowian comedic timing, and frankly, the show has suffered without her. I told a co-worker that there was no way April was coming back this season, but it looks like I could be wrong. I hope I am.

What's you think of the episode? Will Kenny and April reunite? Let me know in the comments. And follow me on Twitter, @wesleycase. Photo by HBO.

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