My prediction: The classic movie channels or revival theaters of the future will be showing "The Kids Are All Right" and "Toy Story 3" back-to-back. They're both terrific comedy-dramas about the conflicts spurred within a home when kids come of age and start packing for college. Annette Bening and Julianne Moore (left and right, above), are tender, funny and veracious as the devoted lesbian mothers -- the kids sometimes refer to them as "the Moms" -- who are also a long-term couple enduring a marital mid-life crisis. Mark Ruffalo brings a full range of laid-back charm and loamy emotion to what could have been a limited character: the man who, at age 19, deposited in a sperm bank (at 60 bucks a pop) the reproductive cells the Moms needed to produce their son and daughter, played by Josh Hutcherson and Mia Wasikowska. These last two characters set the unpredictable plot in motion when Hutcherson demands that Wasikowska (who has just turned 18) contact Ruffalo's "spermster."

These kids are more than all right: they're perfectly imperfect blends of intelligence, impulse and impressionability. They're far more true (and imaginative) than the cute constructs in a film like "Juno," and "The Kids Are All Right" deserves to be an even bigger hit. It's been packing theaters in early engagements and it spreads out to other cities, including Baltimore, tomorrow. For the Live section, I'll be interviewing Baltimore born-and-bred Bart Walker, who helped put together financing and distribution for the movie and has represented its director and cowriter, Lisa Cholodenko, for over a decade.

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Would a bare-bones description of this film have made it sound too much like a liberated sitcom? Do reviews make the difference for you when it comes to seeing movies from art house filmmakers like Cholodenko?

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