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A church-affiliated community action organization is planning a campaign to ensure that Baltimore communities share in the jobs and economic development opportunities that would come with the proposed Red Line east-west light rail project.

The group, Baltimore Regional Initiative Developing Genuine Equality (BRIDGE),  is working with U.S. Rep.   Elijah Cummings to work to ensure that the federal money for the Red Line is shared by the neighborhoods along the planned  route from Woodlawn to Bayview.

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BRIDGE is planning to kick off its economic opportunity campaign  Wednesday, Aug. 4, from 11a.m. to noon on Pulaski Street between Mulberry and Franklin streets -- the site where the Red Line is supposed to meet up with the MARC commuter line at the West Baltimore station. Cummings, a Democrat who represents the Sevent District, is slated to speak.

Maureen Daly, a consultant and volunteer with bridge, said the event is not a protest but an effort to keep up the pressure to provide meaningful, career-building employment and useful community development. "We've learned from experience you have to build it in very early into the proposal," she said.

The state has submitted a $1.6 billion Red Line proposal  to the federal government and is awaiting a decision on funding.

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