Get tickets if you can for the AFI Silver's Saturday night presentation of "The Tillman Story," the terrific documentary about Pat Tillman, the football star who gave up the NFL for the Army and was killed by friendly fire in Afghanistan. (It's one of the most talked-about attractions at the Silverdocs film festival.)

It reminds us that General Stanley McChrystal (below) was a willing political animal when he wanted to be. It was McChrystal who moved to alert the Bush White House that "unknowing statements by our country's leaders ... might cause public embarrassment if the circumstances of Corporal Tillman's death become public."

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Part of what makes "The Tillman Story" a great non-fiction film is its portrait of a strong, individualistic, complicated family. The Army and the Bush administration picked the wrong family to lie to when they created a fictional tale about Tillman's death -- and then refused to come clean on who ordered the coverup even after the truth became known. (The film is an equal-opportunity expose: Democrats in Congress take some lumps here, too.)

But director Amir Bar-Lev picked the perfect family to ground a movie that debunks the power of institutions to exploit the media to create myths -- and salutes the love, self-reliance and skepticism that powers the Tillmans' crusade for an honest account of Pat's death.

One question for my readers: How many of you have seen "Seven Days in May," that first-rate political melodrama about U.S. military megalomania?

Photo by Alex Wong

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