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Kicking zombies in the face with Elizabeth Bennett

Kicking zombies in the face with Elizabeth Bennett

Let's face facts: As soon as the Pride and Prejudice and Zombies iPhone app was announced, everyone knew I was going to buy it. You might even call it "a truth universally acknowledged," you know, if you were in to that kind of thing.

Bottom line: It is lots of fun. For $2.99, you get a 12-chapter zombie-, ninja- and sometimes zombified-ninja-fight game. Also, you get to thwack both Lady Catherine de Bourgh and Wickham around. Talk about satisfying.

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For those who've played PSP games, the format will be familiar. The storyline is given by a bunch of talking heads, and each character has approximately three facial expressions: happy, sad or ENRAGED WITH ZOMBIE LUST! At the beginning of each chapter (yes, just like a book), the scene is set. And then the fighting begins.

Kicking zombies in the face with Elizabeth Bennett

The controls are necessarily rudimentary: Use one hand to control the Elizabeth Bennett's (and one time, Darcy's) movement, the other to control fight moves. After slashing the undead to your heart's content, you clear the level of zombies, picking up coins along the way, and then it's Tea Time!

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Tea Time is where you upgrade your health and fighting techniques using the money you've collected throughout the game. Kung-fu moves include the Tiger Strike, Seven-Starred Fist and Dance of Blades, and each is deployed with a different combination of finger swipes and jabs.

It took what amounts to an hour and a half for me to play the entire game, and that includes the 10 minutes I spent flummoxed because the application kept crashing at the 10th chapter. After restarting my phone, however, the game was back on track. (I've heard others complain of the same problem, with mixed results. Apparently, I was one of the lucky ones that could get to the end.)

All that being said, I'm not sure that the game has a lot of value past the first play-through. Much like the book it's based on, PP&Z's novelty wears off after the first run-through. But for zombie fans, it would be worth showing off to your like-minded friends. And waiting in line is a lot less frustrating when there are zombies to be slaughtered.

(Images courtesy of freeverse.com)

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