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TNA Impact: Sting finally speaks, says nothing

The big angle advertised for Monday night's TNA Impact was that Sting was going to break his silence and explain his actions of the past two months in a face-to-face confrontation with Hulk Hogan.

Sting spoke all right, but after listening to his doubletalk, I still have no idea why – or even if – he has turned heel. When questioned by Hogan, Sting cut a babyface promo, saying that his agenda is the same as it's always been – to give back to the wrestling business and specifically to TNA.

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He then said something about how Hogan had a veil of protection over him in the WWF and WCW, but that protection doesn't exist in TNA. Sting also called Hogan a master chess player.

I'm guessing that Sting was saying that Hogan is the one with his own agenda, and that Sting has been trying to protect the company from him. You're guess is as good as mine as to how that explains Sting teaming with the heels and attacking the babyfaces over the past two months. Trying to sort it all out just gives me a headache.

This "heel turn" by Sting is starting to remind me of his ill-conceived run with the Main Event Mafia. If Steve Borden really doesn't want to portray a heel, then TNA should just keep him babyface and stop with all of the ambiguity.

Good storytelling doesn't have to be complicated. Sting shockingly turned heel last March. OK, you got our attention. Now tell us what his motivation is and let's move forward with the story line.

Other thoughts on Monday's show:

TNA isn't fooling anyone with the spin it put on Impact moving back to Thursdays – the announcers said that the company listened to the fans, who said that they prefer the show on that day – but I don't blame it for trying. …

The TNA world title match between champion Rob Van Dam and Desmond Wolfe was disappointing, as RVD won clean in about three minutes. I understand that the goal was to give RVD a quality win and set up his match with A.J. Styles at the Sacrifice pay-per-view on May 16, but there's no reason why the talented Wolfe had to be treated as such an afterthought. …

Jay Lethal is a talented guy and I enjoyed his Ric Flair impersonation. After the angle last week in which Hogan said that he was going to give Flair's Hall of Fame ring to someone on the roster, I jokingly said to a friend that Hogan should give it to Lethal's "Black Machismo" character as a rib on Vince McMahon for not putting Randy Savage into the WWE Hall of Fame. …

The opening segment with Lethal and Flair and the subsequent brawl that involved, Styles, Wolfe, Beer Money, Hogan, RVD, Abyss and Team 3D got the show off to a hot start. …

Mr. Anderson and Jeff Hardy both showed good intensity during their verbal confrontation. Anderson's mic work has become a weekly highlight of the show, much like CM Punk's promos on Smackdown. …

Eric Young turning heel and joining The Band was as predictable as it was nonsensical. Trying to keep track of the numerous twists and turns in this story line with Young and Kevin Nash takes way more energy than I'm willing to expend. …

The Orlando Jordan segment was brutal, and I'm not referring to the beat-down of Rob Terry. …

I'm still trying to figure out how being stripped of his X Division title because of an act of God makes Doug Williams anything but a sympathetic figure. …

The Jesse Neal-Shannon Moore tag team has potential, but Ink Inc. is the best name TNA could come up with?

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