This week, two bookish movies are being released: "The Losers" (trailer above) and "Paper Man." The first is an explosive (literally) adaptation of the Vertigo comic about a group of secret agents who have to face off against the government. (It comes just a week after the adaptation of Kick-Ass, another popular shoot-em-up comic.) The second features Jeff Daniels playing a failed novelist who has quirky relationships with a 17-year-old girl (Emma Stone) and a superhero. Some early reviews for "The Losers" -- and for "Paper Man" after the jump:

Chicago Tribune -- "The Losers" drags you down to its level at gunpoint with its drooling fetishization of weaponry, its focus on Zoe Saldana in wee shorts, various and sundry assassinations designed with gamers in mind and more rabid mistrust of the U.S. government and its freedom-destroying institutions than you'd find at a tea party fundraiser.

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Orlando Sentinel -- The movie is a stupid, over-the-top comic-booky action picture with the occasional cheesy effect, oddball casting and an utterly predictable get-that-guy-before-he-gets-us plot, but [Chris] Evans and a couple of his mates make it passable entertainment. If "The A-Team" is half this much fun, they'll be lucky.

Village Voice -- Writer Andy Diggle dedicated his snappy DC comic books "The Losers" to '80s screenwriting superstar Shane Black, creator of the Lethal Weapon series. But in adapting "The Losers" for film, director Sylvain White and screenwriters James Vanderbilt and Peter Berg strain to achieve the pleasurable mix of cheap laughs and expensive action that Lethal Weapon pulled off effortlessly with the help of its stellar cast.

Huffington Post -- The Losers is like The A-Team's farm squad -- call them the D-Team. Or perhaps the 2-D team, since this film doesn't exist in three dimensions in any sense -- indeed, it struggles to reach that second level.

New York Observer -- Although the filmmakers work hard to keep the mood light, Paper Man observes loneliness and isolation with increasingly dour and oppressive results. Instead of the feel-good comedy they intended, you are left with the suspicion that the movie is really about a man suffering from an undiagnosed mental illness for which there is no cure.

The Hollywood Reporter -- "Paper Man" is a bad idea, and the film, despite a few brave and good performances, never recovers from awkwardness of its premise. Theatrical potential is highly limited since an R-rated comedy about a midlife crisis and marital and mental problems doesn't seem to have any specific audience.

Orlando Sentinel -- Paper Man ... never quite finds its comic groove, and just as that tone is settling in and not working out, it shifts to something darker and more serious, thus explaining some of the odd behavior we're witnessing. Not nearly enough of it, though.

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