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Kick-Ass movie reviews

This week's literary adaptation -- Kick-Ass -- ain't exactly Jane Austen. But it's taken from a wildly popular work, the comic by superstar Mark Millar. The tale of ordinary kids aching to be superheroes has been done before -- isn't it everyone's wish? Yet Millar gives it an engaging, if bloody, spin. In this interview MiIlar discusses the challenges of finding supporters for his ultra-gory story, which features an 11-year-old killer named Hit Girl. Here are excerpts from reviews (and reviews of more book-to-movie adaptations):

Chicago Tribune -- I started hating this movie around the midpoint. And while Hit Girl's single usage of a c-word more commonly heard in Britain than in America has generated some controversy, the more pressing issue is how stupidly relentless the gore is, from beginning to end.

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New York Times -- Fast, periodically spit-funny and often grotesquely violent, the film at once embraces and satirizes contemporary action-film clichés with Tarantino-esque self-regard — it's the latest in giggles-and-guts entertainment.

Los Angeles Times -- This shrewd mixture of slick comic-book mayhem, unmistakable sweetness and ear-splitting profanity is poised to be a popular culture phenomenon because of its exact sense of the fantasies of the young male fanboy population.

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Associated Press -- Director Matthew Vaughn has made an action comedy so bloody funny — double emphasis on bloody — fans might need to see it again just to catch the gags they missed from laughing so hard the first time.

Entertainment Weekly -- Kick-Ass, directed by Matthew Vaughn (Layer Cake), is an enjoyably supercharged and ultraviolent teen-rebel comic-book fantasy that might be described — in spirit, at least — as reality-based. ... I just wish that the film had ended up a bit less of an over-the-top action ride. It didn't need this much slam-bang when it had us at real-life superheroics.

Roger Ebert -- This movie regards human beings like video-game targets. Kill one, and you score. They're dead, you win. When kids in the age range of this movie's home video audience are shooting one another every day in America, that kind of stops being funny.

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