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It was 32 years ago, and filmmaker Philip Kaufman was striving for an idea that would express how much the hero of his "Invasion of the Body Snatchers," a health inspector played by Donald Sutherland, adored his married co-worker (Brooke Adams). Kaufman needed a gesture that was sensual and generous, that would convey passion and caring without overstepping bounds. "So," he recalls, "I had Donald cook for her. And the ingredients are so fresh, and he slices them and pours them into a wok so lovingly ... you see him set off a glow in her. It's always been one of my favorite scenes: an American man cooking."

Food-based films have recently invaded American movie theaters, with "Ratatouille," "No Reservations," and of course, "Julie & Julia." But using food to externalize all of human passion has always been an element of European films -- as Kaufman says, "[Federico] Fellini and [Ingmar] Bergman appreciated the table as a place of drama." So did Danish filmmaker Gabriel Axel when he made it the center of "Babette's Feast," his austere yet compelling adaptation of an Isak Dinesen short story. It screens 10:15 a.m., at the Wheeler Auditorium of the Central Library. What are your favorite food movies?

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It's followed, after a lunch break, at 2 p.m., by the 2009 reboot of "Star Trek." Next to buying or renting Kaufman's "Body Snatchers" -- which, as noted in an earlier post, costarred Leonard Nimoy at his peak -- there are few better ways to pay homage to the newly-retired Nimoy than to re-see this clever remounting of the history of Spock and Kirk. Nimoy has expressed his admiration for the new Uhura, Zoe Saldana, above. What did you think of the revamped "Star Trek"?

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