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Early reviews of Kindle's app for the iPad

Early reviews of Kindle's app for the iPad

Durn. I was really looking forward to the Battle of the E-readers, with the Amazon Kindle and Barnes & Noble nook confronting the newest challenger on the evolutionary ladder: Apple's full-color, multi-function iPad, which comes out April 3. But Amazon showed off an interesting flanking maneuver this week, releasing some details of its Kindle app for the iPad and other tablet computers. The app -- which is similar to the iPhone app but still being refined -- circumvents Apple's digital bookstore, allowing users to buy from Amazon while using an iPad or other tablet. As Amazon's promotional page says: "Get the best reading experience available on your tablet computer including the iPad. No Kindle required."

That sounds weird coming from Amazon, doesn't it? I can't see Patton being so accommodating. But Amazon -- and Barnes & Noble -- expect the iPad to give e-book sales a significant boost. And if you can't beat 'em, join 'em. Here's what some other tech bloggers are saying:

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Ars Technica -- The bad news is that neither Amazon nor Barnes & Noble will have their apps ready at launch, however; both plan to test their respective apps on actual iPad hardware before releasing them to the public. The good news is that users that already have e-books from those stores will soon be able to read them on the iPad ... .

ZDNet -- Back in November I outlined several problems with the Kindle and Kindle development and gave it three years. Now I think that estimate of the Kindle's lifespan might be an overestimate. The Kindle is toast.

PC World -- The point is, our content shouldn't be locked to any single device. For e-books to take off, we need content and hardware to become totally uncoupled. Amazon's Kindle Apps for Tablet Computers is, at least, a step in the right direction.

Electronista -- Creating the app is consistent with Amazon's approach of making the Kindle store available on as many devices as possible, including Macs, Windows PCs and the BlackBerry, but nonetheless represents an unusual step to cater to a device that most expect will be the Kindle's most direct competition. Amazon is currently believed to be waging a book rights war with Apple in a bid to prevent Apple from having a comparable library ... .

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