xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement

Annapolis Opera offers high-energy production of Puccini's 'Tosca'

Annapolis Opera's 37th season featured a production of Puccini's "Tosca" over the weekend that reconfirmed several things:

There will always be a valuable place for regional opera companies and the live-performance experiences they offer their communities; there are young singers around today capable of giving credible portrayals of challenging roles; economical sets that could be blown over by a good breeze can do the atmospheric job well enough (Arne Lindquist was the designer here); and in an age of stage director supremacy and theatrical concept-run-amok-ness, there's still something to be said for thoroughly traditional approaches (Braxton Peters directed).

Advertisement

Sunday afternoon's performance also reconfirmed a less positive, all-too-familiar fact --

the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts makes a lousy venue, especially for opera. With no pit, it's almost impossible to maintain proper balances between orchestra and stage, an issue extra problematic with a big score like "Tosca." I wonder if that difficulty caused the principals to keep pumping out the volume, as if they feared they wouldn't be heard otherwise.

Advertisement

Jonathan Burton, as Cavaradossi, proved particularly short on a dynamic range. It sure was enjoyable hearing such a healthy tenor voice, one that even boasted an effective ping at the top, but the constant full-throttle wore thin after a while. "E lucevan le stelle" and "O dolci mani" would have benefited greatly from a few truly soft edges.

Elisabeth Richter, in the title role, achieved more in the way of subtlety -- the last lines of "Vissi d'arte" were sculpted with considerable nuance and depth of expression (not to mention terrific breath control). There still were places when more varied and sweeter coloring would have been welcome, but this was nonetheless a solid performance, one full of fire (Richter spat out "Assassino" and "Quanto? Il prezo" with special venom). Like Burton's, the soprano's acting was old-school -- but there's still something to be said for that, too.

Although Jerett Gieseler needed a little more vocal wattage and tonal variety as Scarpia, his phrasing registered effectively. Ryan D. Kuster was the sturdy-voiced Angelotti. Andrew Adelsberger was a lively Sacristan, in voice and gesture.

Collin Powell sang the Act 3 shepherd boy's off-stage song nicely, but it was a major mistake to amplify it so heavily; this, needless to say, should be a distant, evocative sound that blends into the opening scene. (Speaking of mistakes, what was up with the portrait of the Madonna unveiled in Act 1? The figure was was depicted practically with her back to the viewer, rendering unlikely Tosca's comments about the color of the Madonna's eyes.)

The chorus summoned sufficient power for the Te Deum scene. The Annapolis Symphony Orchestra played sturdily and sensitively, for the most part, and Ronald J. Gretz conducted with an admirable interest in rubato and dramatic underlining.

On its own terms, then, a respectable, faithful, high-energy production.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement