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Annapolis isn't the only place where politics is taking a snow holiday.

Washington is almost totally shut down, two days after the snow stopped falling. Downtown streets and sidewalks, in many cases, remain snow-clogged. City snow-clearing crews are nowhere to be seen.

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Many businesses remain closed. The Metro subway, which kept underground service running during the storm, hasn't seen fit to move above ground yet. The underground service, like this weekend's subway service in Baltimore, is running every 30 minutes, instead of the usual six. Downtown Circulator buses are running, and Metro bus service is operating on emergency routes only. Traffic is extremely sparse.

President Barack Obama has hunkered down at the White House, meeting with aides and, this afternoon, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar. Nothing public is on his schedule, thus far. Vice President Joe Biden, who spent the weekend vacationing with his family in Colorado ski country, has nothing on his schedule other than his trip back to DC today. White House press secretary Robert Gibbs' daily briefing was canceled.

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Congress, it goes without saying, isn't meeting. But that's hardly unusual. This is a Monday and Congress typically takes Mondays and Fridays off so they can be home campaigning. But even the home events aren't happening for Marylanders. Sen. Ben Cardin, who was scheduled to visit the University of Maryland BioPark, to talk jobs with Baltimore City Community College students, canceled the event.

If Tuesday's storm delivers the expected 6-plus inches, it could all but wipe out the rest of the week.

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