xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement
Previews of the Apple tablet

We're just hours away from the introduction of the Apple tablet, a product that will revolutionize e-readers, save newspapers, rebuild Haiti and return the Baltimore Orioles to the World Series. Or something like that.

I understand the hype surrounding the iSlate/iPad/iWhatever launch on Wednesday. Steve Jobs' uber-cool products have fantastic design and great features. Consumers pay more for Apple products, but devotees are happy to do that. (I faced some Apple snobbery in my family recently, as we discussed buying new phones. The problem with the Droid, offered through our Verizon service, seemed to be simply that it was not an iPhone, and that using it would create a lingering sense of un-Appleness that could prove fatal.) Here's what folks are saying about the Apple tablet:

Advertisement

New York Times -- It will run all the applications of the iPhone and iPod Touch, have a persistent wireless connection over 3G cellphone networks and Wi-Fi, and will be built with a 10-inch color display, allowing newspapers, magazines and book publishers to deliver their products with an eye to the design that had grabbed readers in print.

CNET -- Apple could launch a streaming-music service at the tablet event, but as I reported last week, Apple has yet to sign any licensing deals for a streaming offering with the four largest recording companies, and my music industry sources say that hasn't changed as of Tuesday afternoon.

Advertisement

Reuters -- Wall Street will pay particular attention to the tablet's price tag. If it is closer to $1,000 than $600, analysts say it will be tougher to convince consumers to buy. Apple could offer it under carrier-subsidized plans -- Verizon Wireless is frequently mentioned -- which might help take the bite out of the purchase price.

PC -- History aside, if much of what we've heard about this tablet is true, I find it hard to imagine how Apple will be able to sell the device for less than $799. A 10-inch OLED screen should be a great power-saver, but is easily the most expensive display technology around.

Forbes -- It means that when consumers watch TV shows and movies, they could potentially be able to do more than just play, pause and stop. When viewing an episode of TV's Mad Men, for example, consumers could tap on objects, such as Don Draper's hat, to get more information about the items and where to buy them.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement