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Here's what we're working on for tomorrow's paper. Let us know what you think.

--The Baltimore Police Department is doing the right thing in dropping tainted internal affairs cases handled by former trial board chief JoAnn Woodson-Branche, who was fired amid accusations that she backdated charging documents. It's unfortunate that police accused of misconduct in those dozen cases – and possibly many more – won't ever be thoroughly investigated for the charges against them and, in cases where wrongdoing occurred, won't be punished. In particular, the dismissal of a high-profile case in which white officers were found to have forced a black officer to look at racist material on the Internet could send a damaging message to the community.

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But it's essential for police officers and the public alike to know that internal affairs investigations will be handled fairly, professionally and thoroughly. Once the department gets done reviewing Ms. Woodson-Branche's cases, Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III (above) needs to determine what conditions allowed these and other problems to develop in the internal affairs division and create clear lines of accountability to ensure they don't happen again. Moreover, the department needs to make those reforms transparent to the public and the police so that the community can be assured that those who are charged with enforcing the law uphold it themselves.

--Who's got $500,000? Surely somebody in this town can come up with that much cash to help city schools chief Andres Alonso to double the number of Teach for America teachers in Baltimore's classrooms over the next two years. Though inexperienced, these teachers bring enthusiasm and leadership potential to the district and serve as an example to students of the importance of scholarship and public service. Given what Mr. Alonso has done so far for the city schools, he deserves to be supported in this endeavor.

(Sun photo)

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