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Among the new releases heading our way Tuesday:

My Remarkable Journey by Larry King (Weinstein, $27.95) Larry King has interviewed more than 40,000 people, from Nelson Mandela and the Dalai Lama to Madonna and Oprah. With this autobiography, King offers personal anecdotes and glimpses of his guests when the cameras have stopped rolling.

The Secret Speech by Tom Rob Smith (Grand Central, $24.99) While Leo Demidov, the Russian detective from Child 44, no longer works as an MGB agent, his past continues to trail him. In this thriller, Leo battles a revenge-seeking gang leader who has taken Leo's daughter hostage.

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Lost Boy by Brent W. Jeffs with Maia Szalavitz (Broadway, $24.95). Jeffs, the nephew of former (now imprisoned) president of Utah's Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (FLDS), recently filed a sexual-abuse lawsuit against his uncle. Two of his brothers, also former FLDS members, killed themselves after leaving the FLDS community. This memoir aims to help former members cross the chasm that stands between the disparate worlds of the FLDS and American society.

Who's Got Your Back: The Breakthrough Program to Build Deep, Trusting Relationships That Create Success—and Won't Let You Fail by Keith Ferrazzi (Broadway, $25) Keith Ferrazzi, author of Never Eat Alone, emphasizes "lifeline relationships" in this self-help book. Ferrazzi believes all goals are achievable through teamwork. The Sign by Raymond Khoury (Dutton, $26.95) TVs around the world are focused on Antarctica, where an ice shelf is breaking. As the calamitous global warming development is being filmed, a giant symbol appears in the sky. A TV reporter and a car thief discover the meaning of the surreal sign.

The American Future: A History by Simon Schama (Ecco, $29.99). In order to form an image of where America is headed, four different historical elements are dissected in this book: American War, American Fervour, What is an American? and American Plenty. Narratives range from the career of Civil War general Montgomery Meigs to J. Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur's perspective of American xenophobia. Schama meets complex history with optimism regarding America's ability to react appropriately to uncertain times.

From Amazon, Publishers Weekly

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