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North Carolina's clinical romp through the NCAA tournament didn't leave a lot of room for emotional swings or piercing analysis.

The Tar Heels had more guys who could score than any team in the country. They had the best point guard in Ty Lawson. They were a crew of skilled, experienced workers who treated winning a national title as their job.

They reminded me of the 2007 Florida team that way. Both teams were picked to win from the jump, both suffered a few stumbles during the regular season and both showed an almost casual ability to flip the switch and vanquish lesser teams come tournament time.

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UCLA's wins in the 1960s and 1970s must have felt similar, but North Carolina's run was almost anithetical to the spirit of the modern tournament. The NCAA sells its biggest event on shocking upsets and nailbiting championship games, but the Heels were too good and too focused for that nonsense.

So it seems appropriate to brush past reflection and talk about how these Heels, who played so much like professionals, will perform in the actual pros. It's funny. As gifted as they were in the college context, I have trouble seeing them as NBA stars.

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Lawson seems the best bet, given his speed with the ball, his strength and his ability to make plays without slowing down. But he's short, even for a point guard, and despite his improved shot, it's not clear that he'll make enough jumpers to keep defenders honest. As great as he was (and he became one of my favorite college players to watch ... ever), he seems more like a solid starter than another Chris Paul.

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Wayne Ellington has a beautiful jump shot. But he's a little short for an NBA shooting guard, and how often did we see him get to the basket and finish or make a clever pass? He's no defensive stopper either, so he strikes me as a scorer off the bench.

Of course, we've known for years that Tyler Hansbrough is unlikely to repeat his college success in the pros. He got stuffed semi-frequently this year, because he lacks quickness and has short arms. NBA defenders will magnify those deficiencies. He could hang around the league for 10 years, because he plays so hard and can hit 15-to-18-foot jumpers. But he'll be a bench player as well.

Danny Green looked great in spurts with his deep range, defensive ability and talent for grabbing loose balls. But he also became a non-factor for long stretches (as in the national championship game, when he got himself in silly foul trouble.) I could see him becoming a better pro than Hansbrough or Ellington, but I could also see him fading away after a few seasons.

Ed Davis has the long arms and quick leaping ability that scouts love. But who knows whether he'll develop a refined offensive game. He has the most upside of this year's Heels but has the longest way to go. He was smart to say he'll return to school.

It's interesting to look at this most gifted of college teams and realize how few members are sure bets for the NBA. The college and pro games are just that different.

I'll leave you with this last bit of wisdom from my wife. If Maryland beat both Carolina and Michigan State, weren't the Terps really the best team in the country this year?

Probably not, huh?

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