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The hapless Washington Nationals will try again tonight to end their seven-game winless streak. Against the Phillies? Good luck to them.

But we here in Baltimore know a thing or two about suckitude, what with 11 consecutive losing seasons, a 0-21 start in 1988, dropping the last 12 games of the 2002 season, getting pounded for 30 runs by the Texas Rangers in 2007 and last year's appalling swoon to wrap up another crappy year.

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And even though the Orioles are looking pretty good now, we all have that sinking feeling that this, too, shall pass.

Adding to the "Misery Loves Company Sweepstakes," is that Baltimore and Washington will play each other six times during May and June. Who among us cannot wait for the pitcher's duel between Alfredo Simon and Daniel Cabrera?

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But it could be worse.

In the history of one-market, two-team atrocities, we are not alone. And as a matter of fact, Baltimore and Washington have been pretty lousy before. In 1962, while the Mets were stinking up the joint in Queens with just 40 wins and the Yankees were winning the pennant and the World Series, the Orioles and Senators combined for a record of 137-186. (For the record, the Mets-Yankees record was 136-186).

In 1935, Boston fans got to watch the Braves and Red Sox stagger to a 116-190 finish. Philadelphia fans were treated to misery squared, when the Phillies lost 90, but the not-to-be-outdone Athletics lost 104.

But for pure ugly, it's hard to imagine a worse scenario than Boston in 1906, where fans were treated to 207 losses over the course of six months. Led by four 20-game losers, the Boston Beaneaters (later the Braves) compiled a 49-102 record. To show solidarity with their brothers in horsehide, the Boston Americans (later the Red Sox) went 49-105-1. Cy Young pitched 28 complete games, but lost a league-leading 21 times.

There, don't you feel better?

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