xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Best books for The Masters

Now that The Masters is underway, you'll no doubt be looking for an activity to occupy the spare minutes between tournament coverage, ESPN highlights, and late-night previews of tomorrow's action. I recommend P.G. Wodehouse's golf stories, which capture both the allure and maddening nature of the sport.

Most tales feature the Oldest Member, a clubhouse curmudgeon whose eyes showed "that peace beyond understanding, which comes at its maximum only to the man who has given up golf." Ensconced in a comfortable chair and holding a drink, he holds forth on the theme of love and golf, or the love of golf. Among his wise words:

"Golf, like measles, should be caught young, for, if postponed to riper years, the results may be serious."

Advertisement

"The ideal golfer never loses his temper. When I played, I never lost my temper. Sometimes, it is true, I may, after missing a shot, have broken my club across my knees; but I did it in a calm and judicial spirit, because the club was obviously no good and I was going to get another one anyway."

"Few things draw two men together more surely than a mutual inability to master golf, coupled with an intense and ever-increasing love for the game."

Advertisement
Advertisement

"In the days of King Arthur nobody thought the worse of a young knight if he suspended all his social and business engagements in favour of a search for the Holy Grail. In the Middle Ages a man could devote his whole life to the Crusades, and the public fawned upon him. Why, then, blame the man of today for a zealous attention to the modern equivalent, the Quest of Scratch!"

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement