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Losing the label of persistently dangerous

It appears that state education officials are backing away from making a big deal out of labeling schools persistently dangerous, an exercise they have engaged in every July since the No Child Left Behind regulations took effect.

For years, Maryland has been one of the few states that took the labeling seriously. So it ended up at one point having the majority of schools in the nation with a label that was both onerous and embarrasing for schools. After getting a lot of criticism, the state board decided to revisit the policy. But state school superintendent Nancy Grasmick doesn't think there is much point spending a lot of time rewriting a policy when it looks as though the feds are going to axe it anyway during the NCLB reauthorization (whenever it finally happens).

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The board had a few minutes of discussion about it today and then moved on to other subjects. So the question still remains, will Grasmick decide to not put out a list this year?

"We think it would be a relief if it didn't have to be such a public event," Grasmick said.

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