I have a column in today's Sun hailing the arrival of the first serious, in-depth TV journalism that seeks to explain how it is that the U.S. economy went totally off the rails last fall.

In the column, I discuss CNBC's House of Cards documentary, which airs at 8 a.m., 8 p.m. and midnight tomorrow, and Frontline's (PBS) Inside the Meltdown, one of the finest hours of non-fiction TV that I have seen in 30 years of writing about the medium.

While nowhere near the league of Meltdown, CBS's 60 Minutes came through tonight with its own top notch report by Scott Pelley (pictured) on one of the corrupt mortgage companies, World Savings, that helped set off the economic collapse.

Pelley focused on Paul Bishop, a whistle-blower mortgage broker at  World Savings, the nation's second largest savings and loan. 

Bishop says he confronted senior management three years before the crash telling them they were "breaking the law" and "sitting on another Enron." He wound up be fired for his words and is now suing.

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I wish Pelley would have gone harder in probing the owner of World Savings, Herb Sandler, and fixing blame for the viewers. It felt like the report might have been pulling a punch or two on this count.

Still it was a powerful piece of TV journalism, and definitely should be added to my list of TV documentaries and reports that are finally catching up with the biggest story in our lives.

(CBS News Photo of Scott Pelley by John Filo)

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