xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Should lower fuel prices mean lower airline fees?

The good news: Gas prices are down just about everywhere. The auto club says the national average is now $2.92/gallon. I filled up in Timonium over the weekend for $2.78. Never been so happy to pump gas. But the bad news is that this certainly won't last since the OPEC countries are planning to cut back on production. That whole supply and demand thing.

For a moment, though, I was hoping that airlines would cut back on those fuel surcharges for trips to Europe and maybe even on some of those add-on fees that were supposed to pay for higher fuel costs. The airlines are surely benefiting from the recent lower fuel costs, so why shouldn't the passengers? Some fliers are, according to Tom Parsons over at BestFares.com. His site says that airlines have dropped fuel surcharges about 18% on flights to London from many U.S. cities. The exception: major East Coast cities, like ours, where the charges remain the same. The New York Times reports that a New Jersey congressman sent a letter to U.S. airlines asking when their fees would reflect the changes in jet fuel prices - down to $2.34 a gallon from $4.33 back in July.

Advertisement

Sorry sir, but I'm not holding my breath on this one. The airlines like what the fees do for their bottom line and passengers have become accustomed to the usual and customary charges. Plus holiday travel time is coming up. And with OPEC on the case, who knows where fuel prices will be in a couple months?

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement