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There is a buzz developing around Bowie outfielder Nolan Reimold, and there should be. He has hit four home runs in the first two Baysox playoff games and is starting to look like the players the Orioles have long hoped he would become. So, what possible reason could they have for not calling him up to the major league club after the Eastern League playoffs come to an end?

The same would seem to apply to Brad Bergesen and some of the other young players who have had solid minor league seasons. What exactly do the Orioles have to lose by bringing those guys up and getting a look at them?

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It's more complicated than you might think, and that's not just because you have to make room for some of them on the 40-man roster. The people in the warehouse I've been talking to say that roster space is not really a major problem. It's more about making sure the kids get put in a position that won't disadvantage them later.

Stay with me here. Prospects are evaluated on many levels, starting with the scouting department, then the minor league staff -- both coaches and administrators -- and eventually the major league manager and coaching staff. While a September call-up would appear to be a very valuable tool to evaluate a young player, and it is, it can also can institutionalize an incorrect perception of a prospect.

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To make a long story even longer, there are very good reasons not to bring up a player such as Nolan Reimold. The Orioles already are trying to get playing time for Lou Montanez and they aren't going to totally abandon the major league veterans. If a player like Reimold comes up and gets 12 at-bats and goes 1 for 12, he doesn't gain anything personally from the experience and he runs the risk of damaging his chances of making the club out of spring training next year.

You'd like to think the major league coaching staff would know better than to draw too much from a quick look, but the manager and coaches are human and they have to sort through a lot of players in spring training. It's just human to file away every impression they get, and a bad September impression could -- even subconsciously -- cost a player at-bats and a fresh start in the spring.

That may not be right, but it's a legitimate concern. Reimold could also come up here and tear it up for a couple of weeks, but he still would have to come back in the spring and prove himself again. Believe it or not, the team may be acting in the best interest of a kid by keeping out of the spotlight -- especially with the major league team disintegrating.

Of course, that doesn't necessarily mean Reimold and Bergesen won't be called up in the next week or so. It's just another explanation for why they might not.

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