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The weekend in review

If you sensed some similarity between the pre-game ceremony last night at Yankee Stadium and the ceremony that followed the last game at Memorial Stadium in 1991, you weren't alone. The Yankees did the same thing the Orioles did, trotting their living greats out to their respective positions in a highly emotional tribute to the past.

Don't you think it's kind of cool that the last home run at Yankee Stadium was hit by a guy -- catcher Jose Molina -- with an ample gut. Babe Ruth, who hit the first homer there more than 85 years ago and said "God knows who will hit the last," would have been proud.

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The Ravens looked solid in yesterday's 28-10 victory over the Cleveland Browns, which boosted them into sole possession of first place in the AFC North. Do you think they'll still be there after next week's Monday Night Football showdown with the Steelers?

Guess I owe Joey Porter an apology. He said the other day that beating the New England Patriots "shouldn't be that hard,'' and I took a shot at both Joey (who probably will insist on being called Albert at some point) and the Dolphins for thinking they could transcend their 1-20 regular-season record dating back to Week 14 of the 2006 season.

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The U.S. team won the Ryder Cup for the first time in nine years, but it was only a coincidence that it happened with Tiger Woods at home rehabbing his surgically repaired knee. I'm sure we're going to hear all kinds of psychobabble about how the U.S. golfers pulled together as a team because Tiger wasn't there, but it's just not that kind of game. Every player may be out there trying to win for the team, but each golfer still has to hit each shot himself. Is it possible that the U.S. golfers finally won because, well, you can't lose them all?

Everyone keeps talking about the 85 years of history at Yankee Stadium, but they're getting the math wrong. There actually were only 84 seasons played there, because the Yankees played two seasons at Shea Stadium while their ballpark was closed in 1974 and '75 for renovations. If you count that time, it's really more like 86 years of history.

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