When it comes to TV viewing, my wife and I have somewhat divergent interests. As in she'll tell me, "You know I don't like watching that!" The "that" could cover a multitude of programming sins, from a showing of Caddyshack to an episode of Family Guy to Craig Ferguson's Late Late Show monologue to just about anything related to sports. On the other hand, she wishes I wouldn't go running from the room every time she pops in a DVD of something with British actors wearing period costumes and riding around in coaches.

So it was kind of surprising when she didn't lunge for the remote or the doorway when I was watching HBO's Costas Now last night. If you like baseball even a little bit, you had to enjoy this show, another "town hall" kind of program featuring a wide-ranging discussion of the sport. The room included a sparkling handful of Hall of Famers -- Willie Mays, Henry Aaron, Jim Palmer, Bob Gibson, Dave Winfield.

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In fact, the Hall of Fame was one topic worked over while Costas spoke with Winfield, Palmer and -- via remote hookup -- Pete Rose. Palmer favored Rose's inclusion in the Hall, but Winfield less so. Winfield was quite forceful in opposition to putting steroid-enhanced players into Cooperstown, while Palmer -- in that way he sometimes has of interrupting himself before completing a thought -- sounded more in favor of a balanced look at a player's career. Former Sun columnist and current Fox baseball reporter Ken Rosenthal explained some of the rationale for voters as they start to face the candidacy of suspected performance-enhanced players. Rose was asked his advice to Roger Clemens and said he would tell Clemens just to come clean, as Rose waited far too long to do. Overall, Rose's appearance just left me feeling sad.

No such sadness, however, attended the interview of Aaron and Mays. The latter displayed none of the bitterness that has accompanied some media appearances. Mays was quite gracious. And Aaron exuded the dignity and pride mixed with humility that makes one wish he was still statistically baseball's home run king.

A good chunk of the talk was about use of steroids or other drugs, past and present. And here is where my wife comes in. When the discussion turned to how major leaguers would take amphetamines to give them a boost during what can be a long season, say, a day game after a night game, she found no sympathy for pill-popping players. I didn't actually take notes, but her rant went something like this: "Aw, those poor guys. What do they do that makes them so tired? They sit around waiting to swing the bat? And they go to bat maybe four or five times? Aw, that's sooooooo tiring. And then they just stand around in the field until they have to pick up that little ball and throw it? Poor babies. It's not like they're playing football."

And so it went on. Next time she's watching some BBC-produced drama, maybe I'll offer my opinion of how I never knew what Emma Thompson saw in Kenneth Branagh.

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