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Maybe I should have waited until this morning to ask for your favorite Orioles-Yankees memory.

Derek Jeter makes a high throw to first base, and the flood gates open. Mike Mussina should have been out of the first inning with only one run allowed. Instead, he’s down 7-0 and still searching for that third out.

"Mooooose" sounds an awful lot like "looooose."
I expected Jeter to go to second base for the force. Jeter apparently had the same idea before choosing to go after Luke Scott instead.

It wouldn’t be the last time that somebody went after Luke Scott.

Is there really any doubt whether LaTroy Hawkins was throwing at Scott? Everyone in the Orioles’ dugout knew it. You just can’t throw at his head, and Hawkins got a little too close.

As Sun beat writer Jeff Zrebiec pointed out in today’s story, it’s probably not a coincidence that Hawkins also came inside to Aubrey Huff, but not to his former Orioles teammates. He didn’t buzz Brian Roberts, Melvin Mora, Nick Markakis or Kevin Millar, but he has no connection to Huff or Scott.

"I knew he was throwing at me," Huff said. "But after you miss me and you miss Luke the first time, you only get so many chances to hit someone. I understand that Jeter was hit and he came out of the game. But that wasn’t intentional. Danny pitches inside and [Jeter] dives a little bit. That’s all part of baseball."

Do the Yankees actually think Daniel Cabrera was throwing at Jeter in the third inning – with a 9-0 lead?

Really?

And the Yankees waited until the sixth to retaliate?

Really?

Scott might be the nicest guy in baseball, and Hawkins was an absolute joy to cover and converse with during his one season in Baltimore. It was strange to see them almost come to blows.

Meanwhile, Cabrera’s reputation continues to follow him around. He’s known as a guy who throws inside and isn’t afraid to knock somebody off the plate. He’s known as a hot-head, someone who’s prone to meltdowns and can’t control his emotions. But that’s the old Cabrera. This year’s model hasn’t walked a batter in his last two starts, and has issued one walk in his last three. He didn’t retaliate last night, even though we were all thinking the same thing. MASN’s cameras showed Cabrera on the field after both dugouts and benches emptied, and again while he sat in the dugout. But he went back out and maintained his composure.

Last year, Cabrera would have pierced Alex Rodriguez’s ear with a 98-mph fastball, or aimed at the space between the 1 and the 3 on A-Rod’s back. And a bad situation would have turned ugly. I’m talking Sam Cassell ugly. But not this time. Not this year. Not this guy.

The best revenge is a 12-2 win – and Scott’s home run that deflected off Saturn. And somewhere, Hank Steinbrenner is standing in front of a mirror, doing his best impression of his father by firing everybody, including one of the SportsCenter anchors and a bar of soap. General manager Brian Cashman is so stressed out, you can hear the acid churning in his stomach if you turn up the television. In HD, he looks like death.

The Yankees are in last place and have lost four in a row. Jeter is day-to-day. So is anyone who works for Steinbrenner.

If you’re the Orioles, who needs to throw at a batter when you’ve got all that going for you?

 

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