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Quick trivia question: What pitcher stopped Hall of Famer Paul Molitor's 39-game hitting streak in 1987. Answer to follow.

The Ravens re-signed kicker Rhys Lloyd and running back Cory Ross. Or they released both of them. Or maybe they signed them again, and then released them. Or maybe they brought them back after re-signing them and releasing them again.

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Does it even matter?

For the record, the Ravens re-signed both players, who will arrive at the Owings Mills complex after taking the Kurt Birkins shuttle.

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The Washington Nationals retained their entire coaching staff. That includes hitting coach Lenny Harris, who replaced Mitchell Page in May after Page took a leave of absence. The Nationals batted .227 and averaged 2.9 runs per game under Page, and batted .264 and averaged 4.5 runs per game under Harris.

I wasn't surprised that the Orioles dismissed Aberdeen manager Andy Etchebarren (more whispers that can't be reported until confirmed). I'd just like an explanation.

It sounds like Etchebarren would, as well, judging by Jeff Zrebiec's item in today's Sun. Asked if he was given a reason, Etchebarren said, "Not really."

"Etch" – another one of those clever baseball nicknames – spent 11 ½ of his 15 playing seasons with the Orioles and was part of four pennant-winning teams. He managed at every level of the farm system and served as a roving catching instructor – duties that carried him to the start of Aberdeen's season. The guy was pulling double duty.

Told to do something, he did it. No job was beneath him. And I kept hearing him praised throughout the organization for being such a good teacher, someone who was better suited – and seemed to prefer – working with the younger players. A Triple-A job wasn't as appealing as wearing a Bluefield or Aberdeen uniform.

Davey Johnson – wasn't he just Dave before managing the Mets? – thought enough of Etchebarren to keep him around as bench coach. But the Orioles have decided that he's no longer needed. And that's their prerogative. They're definitely in "massive change" mode. The old ways sure haven't been working. I just never associated Etchebarren with being part of the problem.

So, I'll ask again: Should he be inducted into the Orioles' Hall of Fame, given his lengthy tenure in the organization as a player, coach, manager and instructor? Just about everyone else from the 1970 team is in there. Who's left? Etchebarren and Merv Rettenmund?

Trivia answer: Current Boston Red Sox pitching coach John Farrell, who's expected to interview soon for the Pittsburgh Pirates' managing job.

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