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We all saw this coming.

Jim Duquette was going to quit or be fired, but he wasn't staying in the Orioles' organization. And today, he made it official: He resigned.

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Once Andy MacPhail was hired as president of baseball operations, Duquette became third on the food chain. And I'm not counting majority owner Peter Angelos, who's the big fish. MacPhail was the No. 1 decision-maker, followed by executive vice president Mike Flanagan and Duquette. Except MacPhail seemed to be making all the decisions, without needing to consult anyone.

In a meeting earlier this week, MacPhail informed Duquette that he was going to bring in someone from the outside to fill a role that would knock Flanagan and Duquette further down the chain. It's only good to be No. 4 in this organization if you're a Hall of Fame manager.

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(How's that for a clever way to work in an Earl Weaver reference?)

I give Duquette credit. He could have accepted a drastically reduced role -- assuming MacPhail was willing to keep him and not simply hoping Duquette would resign before being dismissed -- and continued to collect a fat paycheck. But that's not how he's built.

"It's definitely been an adjustment period and one I wasn't accustomed to," Duquette said of the changes that occurred once MacPhail was hired. "It was a little bit odd at times and I would say a little uncomfortable. One of the things I'm used to is having too much on my plate, and not searching for things. And for me, that was the biggest difference.

"From my standpoint, when I came here, I was hired to a meaningful position, and as I viewed it going forward, it certainly was not going to be, in my view, anything close to what I was doing prior to that. And fortunately, Andy gave me a chance to look elsewhere and perhaps find a better position where I'd have a more meaningful role. I want to be a general manager again, and in my view, here, that was not going to happen."

We can second-guess decisions that were made while Duquette was part of the process, but I appreciate how hard he worked and how accessible he was to the media. He's a good man. He'll take a breather, get reacquainted with his family, tackle the honey-do list that's waiting for him, and attempt to find another front office job before Opening Day.

We can cross the Devil Rays off the list. There's no way they're going to let him get close to Scott Kazmir (just kidding, Jim). But someone will hire him and be the better for it.

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