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Just to show that inexplicable play-calling isn't only a Baltimore phenomena, the undermanned Jaguars squandered one of their few opportunities to hang with the Indianapolis Colts last night when, in the second quarter and behind, 14-0, Jacksonville was near midfield with a fourth-and-inches.

To his credit, Jacksonville coach Jack Del Rio (a former Ravens assistant) decided to go for it, knowing he needed to take advantage of every opportunity his team would have against the undefeated Colts. But rather than do what the Jaguars do best (and about the only thing they do effectively) -- which is pound the ball between the tackles with rugged Fred Taylor -- they tried a fancy end-around with speedy little Maurice Jones-Drew. Indianapolis safety Bob Saunders reacted extremely well, quickly escaped a tangle in the middle of the line and met Jones-Drew on the offensive left side for a one-yard loss.

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The Jags never were in it again as starting quarterback David Garrard was sidelined with an ankle sprain. The Colts breezed, 29-7.

Would it have made any difference had Jacksonville handed the ball to Taylor on that play and  made the first down? Who knows? Probably not. But as you watched that happen, you start wondering, why do coaches feel compelled to prove that they're smarter than the guy on the other sideline rather than simply doing what is most likely to work?

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