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The U.S. Senate is holding a hearing Wednesday (9/26/07) on the impact of climate change on the Chesapeake Bay.

Among those scheduled to testify at 9:30 a.m. in Room 406 of the Dirkson Federal Office Building in Washington are Gov. Martin O'Malley, Chesapeake Bay Foundation President Will Baker and Donald Boesch, president of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.

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The Bay Foundation recently released a report on the subject, which you can read here.

*   *   *   MEDIA ADVISORY   *   *   *
Senate Climate Change Hearing
Sept. 26, 9:30 a.m.

WHO:             Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF) President William C. Baker will testify on the impacts of global climate change on the Chesapeake Bay. Senator Barbara Mikulski (D-MD); Congressman Wayne Gilchrest (R-MD, 1st); Governors Tim Kaine (VA) and Martin O’Malley (MD); Dr. Donald F. Boesch, President of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science; and other experts will also offer testimony.
WHAT:           Senators John Warner (R-VA) and Benjamin Cardin (D-MD), and other members of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee will hold a hearing on the impact of global climate change on the Chesapeake Bay region.
WHEN:           September 26, at 9:30 a.m.
WHERE:        Room 406 of the Dirkson Senate Office Building.
WHY:              Scientists agree: Climate change is here, and across the region we are seeing the effects. Bold, decisive action is needed now, at both the federal and state levels.


Rising temperatures are inhospitable to vital underwater grasses and stress fish populations from striped bass in the main Bay to brook trout in coldwater streams across the region. Sea level rise inundates many of the Bay’s iconic islands—islands that until recently supported thriving communities—and poses new threats to coastal communities. Climate change adds new challenges to an ecosystem already stressed by pollutants, population growth, and increasing development. Fortunately, the situation is not without hope. The fight to reduce the greenhouse gases that cause climate change is not unlike the challenge we face in cleaning up and restoring the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers and streams. And many of the solutions are the same.
*   *   *
Editor’s note: CBF’s climate change report is available at cbf.org/climatechange
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