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There's not a great deal more to be said about the Orioles yesterday, or the day before, or most of last week, than what Sun sports writer Roch Kubatko said in today's account of Baltimore's sixth straight loss, an 11-3 defeat to Minnesota.

Kubatko detailed the wreckage that has occurred at Camden Yards since Dave Trembley's good efforts were rewarded with an extension to manage through 2008. The O's have been outscored, 70-20 (including the historic 30-3 game against Texas). Yesterday's game seemed to sum it all up because even two performers that the Orioles and their fans have come to count on were stymied. Starter Erik Bedard saw his streak of consecutive winning decisions end at nine and Kevin Millar's club record 52 straight games of reaching base ended when Twins outfielder Torii Hunter went above the fence to keep a Millar drive from leaving the park.

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More than 30,000 fans showed up to watch Bedard break Mike Mussina's club record for strikeouts in a season and now that the Orioles are once more hopelessly under the .500 water line, you can figure that Camden Yards will be a ghost town except for when the Yankees and Red Sox visit in September.

* Like a lot of sports fans, I watched bits and pieces of the Little League World Series and then started focusing on the final games. And, of course, that was a terrific finish to yesterday's championship as the team from Georgia (Warner Robins) edged the squad from Tokyo, 3-2, on Dalton Carriker's home run. But what stood out about that whole thing was the dignified way those 12-year-olds carried themselves (notice how quickly they trotted back to the dugout after a strikeout) and yet you realize that they are still very much children. Young Dalton, for instance, saying he felt like Peter Pan rounding the bases. I didn't think kids these days even knew about Peter Pan.  And on the other side, you have to feel terrible for the 12-year-old from Japan who gave up the winning homer. His coach consoled him, saying, "I told him that he has a bright future and not to let this homer affect that." And suddenly, you realize the impact that something like this can have on a child, especially in a culture known for accepting personal responsibility deeply.

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