xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Here's an interesting question to ponder next time you're tossing a few around the dartboard: Will Alex Rodriguez, Ryan Howard, Albert Pujols or some other slugger catch whatever the new career home run mark is before another pitcher wins his 300th game?

With Rodriguez becoming the youngest player to hit 500 homers (at the age of 32), the presumption among many is that he will get the 275-300 more homers needed to take over first place. Pujols and Howard appear eminently capable of getting to 800 homers if they stay healthy. Ken Griffey Jr. is a longshot, but he would almost certainly have to come back to the American League as a designated hitter.

Advertisement

The challenge, though, is to come up with a pitcher who will follow New York Mets hurler Tom Glavine into the 300-win club. It's not as easy as you think.

Arizona's Randy Johnson has 284 wins, but is 43 years old and on the disabled list with recurring back troubles which may signal the end of his career. Former Oriole Mike Mussina is at 246 wins, but is also 39 years old, and not likely to hang around the 3-5 years it would take for him to cross the rubicon of 300. You could advance the names of Kenny Rogers, Pedro Martinez, Jamie Moyer, Curt Schilling, John Smoltz, David Wells or Andy Pettitte, all of whom either have 200 wins or are fairly close, but between age and health, none of them appear on track to log the necessary seasons to get to 300.

Advertisement
Advertisement

On the horizon, Minnesota's Johan Santana and Cleveland's C.C. Sabathia seem to have the combination of youth, talent and early career success to make a run at 300. But in this age of five-man rotations, shaky bullpens, big-money contracts and debilitating injuries, Glavine is looking more and more like the last member of the 300 club.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement