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Here are some interesting statistics from a back-to-school presentation at this week's city school board meeting:

Baltimore has 23 newly appointed principals this school year. Two schools started the year without principals but have assistant principals serving temporarily in the positions.

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The city hired 836 teachers for the new school year, compared with 950 a year ago. It started the school year with 51 teacher vacancies, down from 68.5 last year.

Twenty-six percent of the new teachers are from the New Teacher Project; 11 percent are from Teach for America; and 22 percent are foreign teachers, mostly from the Philippines.

Sixty-percent of the new teachers are from Maryland, 10 percent are from Pennsylvania, and 4 percent are (like new city schools CEO Andres Alonso) from New York.

Seventy-three percent of the new teachers are women. Fifty percent of them are white, while 24 percent are black, 21 percent are Asian and 2 percent are Latino.

Twenty-nine percent of the new teachers have masters degrees. Two percent have doctorates. Fifty-seven percent have prior teaching experience.

Since May 1, 410 city teachers have resigned or retired. Another 150 did not have their contracts renewed because of poor performance, a 50 percent increase from the prior year. And 79 teachers were terminated because they did not have professional certification, a 140 percent increase from the prior year.

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