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I'm not sure where Bud Selig thinks he's going with the whole Jason Giambi thing, but if history has taught us anything it's this: In most major scandals, it's usually the small fish who get fried.

There's word today in USA Today that the baseball commissioner is considering suspending the New York Yankee if he does not cooperate with former senator George Mitchell's investigation into performance-enhancing substances. Giambi, who is on the disabled list at the moment with a foot injury, is in Selig's cross hairs because in another USA Today article earlier in the season, Giambi made a tacit admission to using such substances, referring to them as "stuff." But beyond that -- and this was his real sin, I suspect -- he suggested that all of baseball owes an apology for the steroids era. Now, Selig wants Giambi to elaborate for the Mitchell investigation. However, there's been nothing to suggest that Selig is granting Giambi immunity from further discipline from either the league or the Yankees as a result of whatever he might tell Mitchell.

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I have an idea. Since the right to not incriminate oneself is apparently suspended in major league baseball (and let's not forget that Giambi is one of the few people in the game to show any contrition at all for the steroids scandal), how about just having mass mandatory polygraph testing of league and team officials about who knew what and when they knew it?

There is precedent. The Denver Broncos had one of their own players, wide receiver David Kircus, who was accused of being at fault for a fight during the offseason, do exactly that (he passed).

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