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(Photo courtesy Ticketmaster)

I don't want to like Kathy Griffin, but I do. On her show My Life on the D-List, she comes across as sometimes abrasive and sometimes patently offensive (and always foul-mouthed), but I still think she's funny. Her "reality" show is surely stilted, filled with such stunts as going on a date with Nick Carter specifically to try to get tabloid coverage and "auditioning" handymen. But despite her need for attention that is the conceit of the whole show, she's still engaging and amusing.

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On last night's episode, Kathy learned of the death of her father while she was traveling, and the show took a more serious turn. Her (absolutely hilarious) parents appear on the show regularly, and her father was always a warm presence on screen. To see her going through such a visceral, awful experience on a typically pretty fluffy show was almost unexpectedly moving. Undoubtedly the cameras were there when she got the news, but the show handled the moment well, skipping over any of that footage for clips of her talking about it in an interview. Cameras followed her as she put the finishing touches on a photographic tribute to her dad at his memorial, but did not invade the service itself. And the episode managed to combine the tragic and the comic by the end, with Kathy performing a scheduled show a couple of days later, being straight-up with the audience about what was going on in her life, and paying tribute to her father with some anecdotes.

All in all, I was touched and actually impressed with the episode's careful handling of the death, while still conveying the emotional heft of the situation.

(Speaking of Kathy Griffin, she's at the Lyric Opera House June 27.

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I also saw part of an episode of On the Lot, and it remains pretty boring. Only a handful of filmmakers are left, and they each created a short film. I didn't see all of them, but I was less than impressed with the ones I did see, including the one that got raves from judges Garry Marshall, Carrie Fisher and Wes Craven. All the kind comments surprised me. "You can really write dialogue!" He can? "That was a masterful piece of storytelling!" It was? I agreed with them on the condemnation of a short that was supposed to be a horror film from a tree's perspective. Why was it boring? Nothing ever happened. I wanted to give the show another shot since it's been reformatted since last I'd seen it, but I don't think I will be back.

I neglected to check out America's Got Talent, yet again. Did I miss anything good?

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I'm looking forward to tonight's episode of Top Chef, the second episode of the third season. The first episode saw the departure of Clay, a Mississippi chef who failed on the quickfire challenge when he didn't know what an amuse bouche was (which he would have known had he watched the previous seasons) and then on the main challenge by misusing the exotic meats and fish they were working with.

There was also a tale of redemption (already!). Chef Tre was in the bottom three in the quickfire, but came back to win first prize in the main challenge.

So tonight should be interesting, and I will be watching.

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First off tonight, though, I will be watching So You Think You Can Dance, my personal favorite. I was sad to see earlier this week that Fox had all the clips from the show removed from YouTube. I had rewatched Lacey and Kameron's take on a contemporary routine by Mia Michaels about 15 times and wanted to see it again, but it was gone. Couldn't find any clips on the Fox site, either. I know they have to be concerned with copyright issues, but in this case, I think if anything, people stumbling across the performances would only be more likely to watch the show in the future. Oh well. I can just hope that Fox will make the clips viewable on its own site soon, or else that I didn't delete it from the DVR.

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