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Contract won't distract Suggs

Pro Bowl defensive end Terrell Suggs said yesterday that he wasn't concerned about his contract negotiations, and despite all the greediness we see in pro sports, I believe him.

Suggs looked at ease and extremely comfortable in front of the media when asked about a new contract. Suggs is entering the last season of his contract.

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On the field, he seemed to be having a lot of fun trading barbs with offensive players and goofing around with inside linebackers Ray Lewis and Bart Scott.

Maybe I'm reading this wrong, but Suggs appears confident that a deal eventually will get done that will keep him in Baltimore, regardless if it is completed now or at the end of next season.

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Other observations:

-- Naughty boy, Brian. I heard coach Brian Billick recently took a shot at his favorite local sports columnist at a seminar for local high school football coaches.

What a shame. My heart grieves. I thought I taught him better at the end of the 2005 season when owner Steve Bisciotti publicly reprimanded him, but apparently a little success last year has gone to his head.

I guess I've got to start all over again. Some people never learn, but like any teacher, I'll never give up hope. I love the Compu Coach.

-- Receiver Demetrius Williams blew by Samari Rolle on a long pass play Tuesday, which was reminiscent of last year. The ball was overthrown, but it had touchdown written all over it.

I waited patiently for defensive coordinator Rex Ryan or secondary coach Dennis Thurman to come over and declare it was safety Ed Reed's fault. These days, every thing is Ed Reed's fault.

-- There was speculation that guard Keydrick Vincent walked out of a recent minicamp soon after he learned that he wasn't starting on the right side, and was backing up Jason Brown on the left. Vincent denied it and said he left because he had some personal business to take care of, and it involved an automobile.

"I'm under contract, and I'll play wherever they want me to play," Vincent said. "I'm very aware that this is a business, and I will do anything to help my team."
 
I like the guy's attitude.

-- The Ravens got into a formation yesterday where there were three receivers bunched together on the right side, and I started to get excited. Maybe this was going to be one of those explosive plays they had talked about during the off-season, and finally there was going to be some creativity.

And then quarterback Steve McNair threw a one-yard pass to tight end Kendrick Ballantyne.

Oh well...

It's Ed Reed's fault.

-- Middle linebacker Ray Lewis anointed rookie Troy Smith the quarterback of the future Monday afternoon when he said he was a Troy Smith fan. That was Lewis' way of giving Smith the blessing, and if Lewis said it, you better believe Smith has the backing of McNair.

It will be interesting to see how it all works out with McNair, Smith and Drew Olson.

Ooops, forgot one, "My Man" Kyle Boller, who now becomes "The Big Man" Kyle Boller because he has gained about 15 pounds of bulk.

-- And while on the subject of absences, reserve running back Musa Smith might make veteran Mike Anderson disappear from Anderson's backup role if Smith can stay healthy. Smith is a better third-down back coming out of the backfield.

-- Between McNair and receivers Derrick Mason and Mark Clayton, they have the timing down on a lot of out routs in practice. McNair doesn't deliver the ball with a lot of zip, but he puts it right on the fingertips of the receivers.

That's the ideal location because if the receiver can't catch the ball, then it's incomplete and can't be intercepted.

-- We won't see much of the running game until training camp, according to Billick. He would like to run the plays when the players are in full pads. The Ravens are expected to attack the edges or the perimeter more because new running back Willis McGahee is more of a change-of-direction back than former starter Jamal Lewis.

What's interesting is that the Ravens, in 2000, forced teams to attack the outside because they had two enormous defensive tackles in Sam Adams and Tony Siragusa. A lot of the teams copied the Ravens, but the Ravens were one of the last teams to attack the outside until they signed McGahee in the off-season.

I bet it was Ed Reed's fault.

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