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A couple of things about the NBA Finals that resume tonight with San Antonio leading the series, 2-0, and everyone who was ready to coronate Cleveland's LeBron James feeling a little sheepish.

If the Cavaliers fall behind early, say by 10 in the first quarter, the few people who tuned in to ABC to begin with will be clicking their remotes faster than you can say Eva Longoria. The NBA has been getting hammered in the TV ratings and ran into The Sopranos buzzsaw Suday night. Tonight, the competition across the dial is particularly weak, stuff like figure skating and the U.S. Poker Championship on the sports channels. But we all know how those pesky reruns of Law & Order and Sex and the City can drive David Stern crazy.

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But seriously, folks, does it occur to anyone else that the Spurs' Tony Parker is this year's Dwyane Wade? That consummate do-it-all guy who raises the games of even star teammates like Tim Duncan and Manu Ginobili. Parker's timing is impeccable, too. His playoff statistics are better than his regular-season numbers and his performance during the playoffs has gotten steadily more impressive as the Spurs have moved through the rounds.

And, finally, should the Spurs polish off the Cavaliers and win their third Larry O'Brien Trophy in five years (fourth in nine), should they be anointed a dynasty? OK, certainly not in the mold of the Michael Jordan Bulls dynasty or the Shaq or Kareem Lakers dynasty or Red Auerbach's Celtics dynasty, but at least in the context of the 21st century NBA, where there's been a fair amount of parity/mediocrity?

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At least in odd-numbered years (they won in '99, '03, '05 and are on the verge here in '07), I think they make a strong argument.

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