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Shoot that stinkin' messenger

When it comes to performance-enhancing drugs, Major League Baseball's attitiude is that the very worst thing you can do is speak the truth.

In a sport in which the depth of steroid use is deemed so pervasive that Congress and grand juries have hearings about the subject, Yankee Jason Giambi stands nearly alone in admitting his culpability regarding whatever he took to become a slugger. And late last week, he said what has been obvious to fans for years. That during the time when steroids allegedly were being used in a number of clubhouses that the people who knew, or should have known, ignored the problem. And an apology is owed by all parties, Giambi suggested.

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For that, Giambi is being investigated by MLB, and the Yanks may be trying to figure out how to tear up his contract.

Chief apologist for Major League Baseball is Yankees general manager Brian Cashman, who had this to say, "There's an implication that there was a lot of people that were involved that would know that, what was going on, and I can tell you that's false.''

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Mr. Cashman, if they didn't know, they were darn stupid. These teams pay trainers and doctors to watch these high-priced investments like hawks. Players receive physicals regularly. They are under the constant scrutiny of the training staffs. And no one became suspicious?

Who believes such nonsense?

But, of course, as is often the case with inconvenient messages, it's the messenger who is seen as the problem.

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