Yesterday, I discussed the Floyd Landis case going on at Pepperdine in Southern California. I mentioned how complex and confusing the whole thing had become with mountains of legal and scientific minutia.

Put briefly, an arbitration panel is hearing testimony about Landis' positive doping test results following his Tour de France triumph last year. If it finds those results valid, Landis essentially is stripped of his Tour de France victory. The trial is expected to last into next week.

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But the case went from mind-numbing to stomach-turning yesterday.  Greg LeMond -- the first of America's modern cycling heroes and someone who was expected to offer testimony in support of the prosecution -- said he received an anonymous call recently that carried a threat.  That threat was to expose LeMond's own revelation to Landis that Lemond had been sexually abused as a child. The implication was that the caller -- who apparently turned out to be a longtime Landis associate -- was trying to intimidate LeMond and influence his testimony.

Landis' defense team quickly moved to distance the beleagured rider from the actual caller but again, something that seemed so simple and wholesome at the time, winning a bicycle race, has morphed into something else that is as sordid as it is complicated.

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