Now that all of yesterday's unpleasantness is behind us, we appear to have nothing but sunny skies and fine, cool autumn weather ahead of us for at least a week. Here's the National Weather Service forecast.

The arrival of colder air from Canada will be noticeable. The big question is whether the coastal storm that's expected to be set loose off the Southeastern coast will drift off to sea, or turn and travel up the Atlantic Coast and spoil the Thanksgiving Week party.

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In the meantime, don't forget to take advantage of the fine, clear weather and step outside this weekend for a look at the Leonid Meteor Shower. This annual event is forecast to peak sometime between 11 p.m. Saturday and 2 a.m. Sunday. But you have a fair shot at seeing an unusually large number of "shooting stars" in the wee hours of any night this weekend.

The best time to look is after the constellation Leo has risen in the east (around midnight). But if you want to optimize your time outdoors and loss of sleep, try the few hours before dawn, when Leo is high but before twilight begins.

Leo's presence is necessary because, at this time of year, Leo is in the part of the sky toward which the Earth is rushing in its orbit around the sun. So as we plow through the dust left behind (in 1932) by the comet Tempel-Tuttle, Leo appears to stand where the dust grains strike the atmosphere, glow and make themselves visible. Think of them as snowflakes caught in the headlights of a speeding car. They appear to be rushing toward the Earth's "windshield."

Anyway, before midnight, Leo is below the eastern horizon, so we won't see many meteors then. After Leo rises, we're in a better position to see the meteors as they strike the air.

Dress warmly. Bring something to sit in (or better yet, lie down on). And a thermos of something warm will help, too. Let me know what you see.

And don't forget the International Space Station, if you're up early on Saturday. The ISS and its crew of three will rise above the southwestern horizon at 6:11 a.m. By 6:14 it will be passing Saturn, high over the southern horizon before heading off toward the northeast at 17,500 mph. If you're in Ocean City, it will pass directly overhead.

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