xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Worthy of note: The number of independent voters who registered as Democrats just so they could take part in yesterday's primary between pro-Bush-War Joe Lieberman and anti-Bush-War Ned Lamont.  According to the New Haven Register, where Lieberman resides, the Senate primary -- or, one might argue, the War in Iraq -- brought an unprecedented number of voters into the Democratic Party ranks, with 28,886 added to the rolls since May, for a total of 696,823.

A significant number had been Independents in a state that has some 900,000 unaffiliated voters. About 40 percent of the eligible Democrats voted, an unprecedented turnout for a primary election.

There was heavy grass-roots organizing in The Blog-o-Sphere, and, the Register reports, the Lamont win "strengthens the credentials of the 'Netroots,' citizens who organize and communicate about politics on the Internet, where $1 million was raised for Lamont's effort."  Netroots helped Howard Dean get on track in the 2004 presidential race, but Lamont marks their first big winner in a congressional race. (In Maryland's Third District Congressional race, anti-war Democrat Oz Bengur appears to have embraced this strategy, spending a lot of dough on Internet advertising and e-mailing.)

Advertisement

Said Tim Tagaris, who worked as part of the Democratic National Committee Internet team before joining the Lamont campaign: "This is no small accomplishment for the bloggers."

The result of all this: A three-term senator, the Democratic vice-presidential candidate in 2000, lost to an upstart businessman, a political nobody at the start of the year, who ran an anti-war campaign.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Lesson to Lieberman: He should never have got into that huggy-kissy thing with George Bush! It was the kiss of political death in 2006.

Meanwhile, a new CNN poll shows opposition to the Iraq War at an all-time high among Americans. Sixty percent oppose the war, and only 36 percent support it. That's half the number of Americans who said they supported the war as it began.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement