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If you haven't seen it yet, you'll want to be sure to catch highlights of Asheville Tourists skipper Joe Mikulik. The manager of the Colorado Rockies' Class-A affiliate put on a comedy show that would make Eddie Murphy proud during a game on Sunday. Upset with a call, Mikulik ran onto the field, dove into second base, pulled out the bag and threw it into the outfield.

He wasn't done there though. Mikulik also tossed the resin bag off the pitchers' mound, covered home plate with dirt and slammed his water bottle on the ground.

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Mikulik has inspired me to introduce my Subway Theory. Have you ever noticed that after following in Jared Fogle's footsteps and eating a six-inch sub for lunch from Subway, you smell like the restaurant for the rest of the day? It's impossible to get the odor off you and your clothes unless you take deliberate action.

So what does that have to do with sports? Certain athletes, managers and other sports personalities leave us with a single impression even if they are in the business for several years. For example, when I say Kyle Turley, you think of the tantrum he threw while with the New Orleans Saints. When I say Pete Rose, you think gambling. When I say Latrell Sprewell, you think of choking a coach. This is the Subway Theory. Those athletes can't shake the one thing they will always be known for. They can't get the Subway odor off their clothes (or uniforms).

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Now, I don't know if I'll ever hear the name Joe Mikulik again after this boils over. But if he goes on to manage in the Major Leagues (Sidenote: Wouldn't this be a great move for an owner? Think about it. If this guy managed the Orioles and agreed privately to go off like this once in awhile, you wouldn't want to watch?) and has success, I'll probably still think of him as the guy who threw the tremendous tantrum with the Asheville Tourists.

All-disappointment team

With the midway point of the season approaching next week, we decided to take a look at some of the major fantasy disappointments of the first half of the season on last week's podcast. I tried to stay away from guys whose numbers suffered mainly becaues of injuries.

Mark Teixiera, Rangers: Texas' first baseman has not put up the power numbers that people expected this year. After hitting 81 homers in the past two seasons, Teixiera has managed just eight bombs in 2006. He went 22 games without a homer before hitting one on Friday. That being said, with no major injuries to speak of, Teixiera should have a much improved second half of the season.

Todd Helton, Rockies: It looks like his power is completely gone. Helton hit a disappointing 20 homers in 2005 and has managed just seven this season. He is hitting .307, but if Helton's power numbers are going to be so low, fantasy owners need him to have one of the top averages in the league.

Marcus Giles, Braves: Atlanta's second baseman had hit .290 or better in three straight seasons but sits at .239 in 2006.

Juan Pierre, Cubs: Chicago's outfielder hit .300 or better in three of his first four full seasons in the Major Leagues. Last year, he hit .276, and this year, he is batting .248 with an OBP of .294. Pierre has still stolen 24 bases.

Jim Edmonds, Cardinals: His average dipped to .263 a year ago, but fantasy owners coud live with that because of Edmonds' 29 homers. This season, he is hitting .260 with seven homers, partly because of injuries.

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