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Maryland lawmakers to consider appointment of state treasurer

State Treasurer Nancy Kopp, Gov. Larry Hogan and Comptroller Peter Franchot at a Maryland Board of Public Works meeting on Feb. 8, 2016, at the State House in Annapolis.
State Treasurer Nancy Kopp, Gov. Larry Hogan and Comptroller Peter Franchot at a Maryland Board of Public Works meeting on Feb. 8, 2016, at the State House in Annapolis.(Joshua A. McKerrow / Baltimore Sun Media Group)

Maryland’s General Assembly leaders have appointed a committee of lawmakers to consider applicants to be the state treasurer.

Delegates and senators vote every four years to select the treasurer, who manages the state’s money and sits on the powerful Board of Public Works. The Board of Public Works comprises the treasurer, comptroller and governor, and oversees state contracts and issues involving state lands and waterways.

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Nancy Kopp, a Democrat and former state delegate, has been treasurer since 2002 and has re-applied for the job.

The position paid $149,500 last year, according to state records.

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It’s not clear yet if anyone else has applied. The General Assembly posted a job listing last month.

The committee will conduct public interviews Feb. 12. The election of the state treasurer will be Feb. 19 during a joint session of the House of Delegates and the state Senate.

The committee that will review applications and conduct the interviews will be co-chaired by Sen. Katherine Klausmeier and Del. Adrienne Jones, both Democrats from Baltimore County. The other members are: Sen. Delores Kelly, a Baltimore County Democrat; Sen. Nancy King, a Montgomery County Democrat; Sen. Adelaide Eckardt, an Eastern Shore Republican; Sen. George Edwards, a western Maryland Republican; Del. Kathleen Dumais, a Montgomery County Democrat; Del. Talmadge Branch, a Baltimore Democrat; Del. Nic Kipke, an Anne Arundel County Republican, and Del. Kathy Szeliga, a Baltimore County Republican.

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