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Baltimore mayoral campaigns wait on election results

Election parties were on hold across Baltimore late Tuesday as election results began to pour in.

The mood was upbeat at Game in South Baltimore where supporters in red waited for former Mayor Sheila Dixon to arrive, as a disc jockey played Beyonce, Usher and other party songs.

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Dixon was on the heels of front runner state Sen. Catherine E. Pugh. Pugh held a roughly 5-point lead over Dixon, according to early returns.

At the Harbor Hotel in downtown Baltimore, a few dozen Pugh supporters cheered as returns went up on a television set in the corner, and they gathered around to watch in a mostly empty ballroom.

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Across the city, a few people showed up to Pugh's West Baltimore campaign office in hopes of getting paid for jobs at the polls that never materialized. People milled about outside the building, where security guards were posted at the entrance.

Tearria Edmonds and her fiance Keith Robason said they signed up to work for the Pugh campaign during early voting, even filling out tax forms. When they showed up at 5:30 a.m. on Tuesday as instructed, there was no work for them.

Despite assurances Tuesday morning from a campaign spokesman that everyone who signed up to work would be paid, that wasn't the case, Robason said. "They ain't give us our money," he said.

Edmonds said she was frustrated that she paid for a babysitter for the day she signed up with the campaign then again on Tuesday, putting her in a hole without the $100 that she and her fiancé had each been promised.

"I feel like I was cheated," she said. "It was disorganized."

Lawyer Elizabeth Embry and businessman David Warnock trailed Pugh and Dixon, according to early returns.

Embry arrived shortly before 10 p.m. and told her supporters she spent the day "literally going from poll to poll all day long." She described the day as "exciting and wonderful"

When asked how she felt about some polls staying open until 9 p.m., Embry said, "Anything to make sure everyone can vote"

Embry's childhood piano teacher Margaret Budd joined her party at the Belvedere Hotel inside a small ground floor ballroom.

"I'm devoted to her," Budd said. "There is no more honest, committed, capable person than Elizabeth."

She's known Elizabeth since the fifth or sixth grade, and has supported her campaign from the start, but she said her stance on education and crime really spoke to her.

"I just think that education is the answer," Budd said.

If Embry does not win the mayoral race, Alicia Stewart said she would "absolutely like to see her as State's Attorney."

Vince Vassilev said that he has "a very strong theory that she will run for State's Attorney" if she loses the election and could potentially run again for mayor. He said "she's very determined to help the city."

At Warnock's watch party at Verde in Southeast Baltimore, more and more people joined the group with loud music playing in the background and people eating pizza and drinking beer.

Among his supporters was Michael Robinson, 67, a retired educator from North Baltimore. He was familiar with some of the programs Warnock brought to the city in the past several years.

"He was bringing the resources of his own energy and awareness and his own ability to marshal money resources with an awareness of the kind of initiatives that are needed," Robinson said.

Baltimore Sun reporters Andrea K. McDaniels, Liz Bowie, Hannah Klarner and Abby Mergenmeier and Pamela Wood contributed to this article.

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