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September 2011 Program Guide

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1
TOO CHRISTIAN TO BE ELECTED?
Are the Republican presidential candidates too Christian? Bill Keller, Executive Editor of the N.Y. Times said they were in a recent major Times Magazine article. The attack, from him and others , on the religious beliefs of Perry, Romney and Bachmann raises some interesting questions about faith and politics in contemporary America--and, of course, we discuss those questions with a stellar panel.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4
CHICAGO ARCHITECTURE
"Architecture is frozen music," said Goethe. How harmonious or discordant are the recently erected buildings in Chicago and its environs? Addressing that question in a full "tour d'horizon" are Blair Kamin, the architecture critic for the Tribune and John Ronan, one of the leading practitioners on the contemporary architectural scene.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5
ADULT IN AGE ONLY
Young Americans now entering adulthood are, compared to their parents, more amoral, more politically uninformed, more sexually adventurous and more often drunk(!!). So say the authors of a new book titled LOST IN TRANSITION, based on a major sociological study. Hilary Davidson and Kari Christofferson, two of the authors from Notre Dame University join us.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6
POLITICAL NEWS ROUNDUP
Jimmy Hoffa Jr threatens the GOP before an Obama "jobs" speech while Sarah Palin aims strong words at the pro union crowd. Just another day on the political landscape. Milt discusses these topics and fields your calls.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7
COCO CHANEL'S SECRET WAR
Coco Chanel was a fashion trailblazer in the early-to-mid 1900s. She's responsible for the look of the modern woman (simple yet elegant) and created a number of styles that still exist today (bell-bottoms, trench coats, turtlenecks and more). But she disappeared from the public eye at the start of World War II. Chanel closed her business in Paris, moved into the Ritz hotel and eventually left for Switzerland after the war. For years rumors persisted that she helped gather information for the Germans while upholding an affair with a Nazi master spy. Hal Vaughn has uncovered the truth as told in the new book, SLEEPING WITH THE ENEMY, and he joins us to explain how Chanel went from fashion icon, to German intelligence operative, to French exile and (full circle) back to the top of the fashion world by rebuilding the House of Chanel in Paris.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8
MONKEY SEE, MONKEY DO
Chimpanzees are man's closest living relative in the animal kingdom. It's no wonder that scientists research these mammals in an attempt to better understand how man operates. Elizabeth Lonsdorf and Stephen Ross, both of the Lincoln Park Zoo, co-authored THE MIND OF THE CHIMPANZEE, a book that compiles the top chimp research from around the world on imitation, face recognition, tool use, cooperation, reconciliation and more. They share this knowledge with us, including some more recent findings not found in the book.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11
NO SHOW
After the Cubs' game, WGN presents a tribute to 9/11.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12
HOW BUMS HELPED SHAPE THE WESTERN U.S.
As railroads cut paths into the American west in the late 19th century, fertile lands with vast agricultural potential were opened up to Americans. But those who made the choice to head toward the Pacific and settle as farmers needed help harvesting their crops. Enter the bindle-carrying hobo. Men, women and even children would show up, gather a ripe crop and head to the next field when the work was finished. Their work was so important that eventually hobo colleges sprouted up to educate individuals on fruit tramp etiquette. Mark Wyman has taken the task of chronicling this underrated figure in American history in a book simply titled, HOBOES. He joins us to discuss it.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13
THE LATEST FROM FERMILAB
Chicago's Fermilab National Accelerator Laboratory has served as trailblazer of high-energy physics for 40 years. Lab director John Peoples Jr ., archivist Adrienne Kolb, head of the theoretical physics division Chris Hill and chairman of the University of Chicago Astronomy & Astrophysics department (and former Fermilab employee) Rocky Kolb join us to provide insight on the latest research and a historical look at Fermilab as described in the book, FERMILAB: PHYSICS, THE FRONTIER & MEGASCIENCE.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14
LITTLE WORDS, BIG MEANINGS
University of Texas at Austin psychologists James Pennebaker and Sam Gosling are our guests. Pennebaker is a well-established social psychologist who claims to read minds (or, at least, personality patterns and secret intentions, worries and concerns) through the way particular people use pronouns, prepositions and other "function words." He has a new book on the subject (THE SECRET LIFE OF PRONOUNS) and discloses all.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15
9/11 AND THE FUTURE OF NATIONAL SECURITY
A decade after the most devastating terrorist attacks in American history, two different administrations have spent billions on domesitc and foreign security measures. But just how much safer have these wars, technologies and new laws made the United States? An important new book, CONFRONTING TERROR, compiles essays on the subject by John Ashcroft, Michael Chertoff, Alan Dershowitz, Andy McCarthy and more leading security scholars. John Yoo and Dean Reuter contributed to and edited the publication. They join us to dissect effectiveness and feasibility of our national security strategy.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18
NICE GUYS NO LONGER FINISHING LAST IN THE BUSINESS WORLD
Companies like GE, Goldman Sachs and BP make negative headlines yet still rake in record profits. Though it may seem like bad guys are finishing first in the business world, Laurie Bassi argues that evidence shows good outperform their amoral counterparts in the short- and long-term. Her new book is titled, GOOD COMPANY: Business Success in the Worthiness Era.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19
THE BIRTH OF A MODERN POLITICAL ELEPHANT
From the end of World War II until the mid-1950s, NY governor Thomas Dewey and US Senator Robert Taft from Ohio fought for control of the Republican party and the GOP presidential nomination. This power struggle, which ultimately led to an organized effort against Dewey's leadership, helped cultivate the party as a vehicle for conservatives. Michael Bowen wrote THE ROOTS OF MODERN CONSERVATISM which chronicles how seemingly trivial differences snowballed into a larger question of what "true" Republicanism meant. He joins us to unravel Dewey, Taft and the battle for the Republican party.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20
WHAT DO MARK TWAIN, GEORGE ORWELL & LEWIS CARROLL HAVE IN COMMON?
Pen names have been around since the beginning of books. But why do writers take on these aliases? We are joined by author Carmela Ciuraru (that really IS her name). Her new book NOW DE PLUME explores the secret history of pseudonyms.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21
ISRAEL
As the world gangs up on Israel in New York this week, we turn our attention to that beleaguered nation now under policy attack from Turkey, Egypt, (and the US?), not to forget Iran and Ahmadinijad. Our guests are Orly Gil, the Consul General for Israel in Chicago and the Greater Midwest, and Charles Lipson, Professor of International Relations at the University of Chicago.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22
ANALYSIS OF THE GOP DEBATE
Directly following the night's debate between Republican presidential candidates, Chris Robling, Dick Simpson and Richard Baehr break down the highs and lows from the party's haves and have-nots.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 25
HEALERS
David Schenck and Larry Churchill co-authored HEALERS, a book that describes some of the top medical practitioners in terms of their ability to heal. These doctors not only understand the science but also cultivate a social dynamic in their treatment. HEALERS maintains the most successful healers balance science, ritual and spirituality, and Schenck and Churchill present their evidence on Extension 720.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26
NO SHOW (CUBS BASEBALL)

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27
NO SHOW (CUBS BASEBALL)

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28
NO SHOW (CUBS BASEBALL)

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