Ramone's paint and body shop, which serves as a retail store in Cars Land, is an exact replica of the U-Drop Inn, a restored Art Deco gas station and restaurant in Shamrock, Texas, that now serves as a tourism bureau and chamber of commerce office.

Mater's Junkyard Jamboree

Mater's Junkyard Jamboree combines an old-fashioned whip ride with a spinning teacup platform. Themed to the beloved rusted tow truck from the "Cars" movies, the attraction features ride vehicles designed to look like the herd of baby tractors that raced through Radiator Springs in the first movie.

That's a rather long set-up to get us to Oatman, Ariz., probably the closest correlation to Radiator Springs, the fictional town represented in Cars Land. Oatman is known for the wild burros that wander the streets and even into shops. Those same burros were the movie inspiration for the baby tractors - and the connection to Cars Land.

The bottom line, according to historian Wallis, is you can't fully appreciate Cars Land without a visit to Oatman, located just west of Kingman.

"I sense a lot of Oatman, Ariz., in Radiator Springs," Wallis said.

Fillmore's Taste-In

The geodesic dome drink stand in Cars Land looks similar to the former Ortega's Indian Market in Lupton, Ariz.

Luigi's Flying Tires

The tilting tower of tires in front of the levitating bumper cars ride in Cars Land recalls the intentionally leaning water tower near the Texas panhandle town of Groom.

Sarge's Surplus Hut

Several Quonset huts can be found in the Mojave Desert near Barstow that resemble the retail shop in Cars Land.

Wallis suggests that any Route 66 travelers that complete the journey from Chicago to Santa Monica can now continue a bit farther down the road to Cars Land in Anaheim for a true Hollywood ending.

"The first time I walked into Cars Land, it looked like a movie set," Wallis said. "It's so well done that people ask, 'Is this where they shot the movie?' "

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